Understanding the process of finding serious vulns | BOT24

Understanding the process of finding serious vulns

Our industry tends to glamorize vulnerability research, with a growing number of bug reports accompanied by flashy conference presentations, media kits, and exclusive interviews. But for all that grandeur, the public understands relatively little about the effort that goes into identifying and troubleshooting the hundreds of serious vulnerabilities that crop up every year in the software we all depend on. It certainly does not help that many of the commercial security testing products are promoted with truly bombastic claims - and that some of the most vocal security researchers enjoy the image of savant hackers, seldom talking about the processes and toolkits they depend on to get stuff done.

I figured it may make sense to change this. Several weeks ago, I started trawling through the list of public CVE assignments, and then manually compiling a list of genuine, high-impact flaws in commonly used software. I tried to follow three basic principles:

For pragmatic reasons, I focused on problems where the nature of the vulnerability and the identity of the researcher is easy to ascertain. For this reason, I ended up rejecting entries such as CVE-2015-2132 or CVE-2015-3799.

I focused on widespread software - e.g., browsers, operating systems, network services - skipping many categories of niche enterprise products, Wordpress add-ons, and so on. Good examples of rejected entries in this category include CVE-2015-5406 and CVE-2015-5681.

I skipped issues that appeared to be low impact, or where the credibility of the report seemed unclear. One example of a rejected submission is CVE-2015-4173.

more here..................http://lcamtuf.blogspot.com/2015/08/understanding-process-of-finding.html


Share on Google Plus

About Bradley Susser

    Blogger Comment
    Facebook Comment

0 comments :

Post a Comment